More than a word. Reconciliation takes action.

Reconciliation Week is a really important week for Northern Australia Primary Health Limited. Within our organisation, an informal reconciliation journey has been enduring across in many ways and for many years.

Twenty per cent of our workforce currently identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and these voices are central in discussions and work around recognition, reconciliation and fostering mutually respectful, meaningful, and inclusive relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across our region.

As an organisation, we share the vision of Reconciliation Australia of a just, equitable and reconciled Australia. That's why we're excited to be launching a Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) very soon.

National Sorry Day

National Sorry Day is a day to remember and acknowledge the mistreatment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were forcibly removed from their families and communities, which we know as ‘The Stolen Generations’.
To commemorate National Sorry Day 2021, some of our team members from across our many services and programs shared what the day means to them. You can join in the conversation on Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn

See the full videos below. 

 



Mabo Day


Mabo Day is a particularly special occasion for one member of our team. For Indigenous Health Project Officer Genus Passi (pictured), it commemorates the day that land rights were recognised for his family's property on Mer (Murray) Island.


Genus' grandfather Dave Passi fought for his family's land off the far tip of Far North Queensland in the Mabo case. He is the last living Mabo case awardee.

"It is my father's land, my grandfather's land, my grandmother's land. I am related to it, it gives me my identify. If I don't fight for it, then I will be moved out if it and [it] will be the loss of my identity." ~Father Dave Passi, Plaintiff, 'Mabo' Case in 'Land bilong Islander' 1990

For more than 200 years, the Australian governments acted under the presumption that Australia belonged to no-one before colonisation.

That legal concept, known as "terra nullius", stripped Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of their traditional rights to their lands and attempted to sever connections to cultures dating back 65,000 years.

June 3 marks the momentous victory to overturn that precedent in the High Court and honours the legacy of the man behind it — Eddie Mabo.

At Northern Australia Primary Health Limited, we recognise and celebrate these important commemorations as we continue to explore how we can contribute to achieving reconciliation in Australia.